"Mad was the last kid I saw and he was asleep. He was 3 months old and they put him in my arms and he stayed asleep and they put him in the bath and he stayed asleep and I thought he was narcoleptic or something. Then he opened his eyes and just stared at me for the longest time and I just stared at him and I started crying and he smiled. And it wasn’t that he smiled that he liked me, it was just that I hadn’t held children in my life and I was always considered so dark and I always had so many things that made me feel like maybe I shouldn’t be somebody’s mom because certainly the world has an opinion of me and I’m not so sure about myself and am I gonna be the best mom? So the fact that this little kid seemed at ease gave me the courage to feel like I could make him happy. And so we became a family right then." — Angelina Jolie

"Mad was the last kid I saw and he was asleep. He was 3 months old and they put him in my arms and he stayed asleep and they put him in the bath and he stayed asleep and I thought he was narcoleptic or something. Then he opened his eyes and just stared at me for the longest time and I just stared at him and I started crying and he smiled. And it wasn’t that he smiled that he liked me, it was just that I hadn’t held children in my life and I was always considered so dark and I always had so many things that made me feel like maybe I shouldn’t be somebody’s mom because certainly the world has an opinion of me and I’m not so sure about myself and am I gonna be the best mom? So the fact that this little kid seemed at ease gave me the courage to feel like I could make him happy. And so we became a family right then." — Angelina Jolie

(via homicidalbrunette)





hittings:

A paparazzi photo of Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt in the back seat of a car (2005), Raymond Pettibon’s Artwork for Sonic Youth’s album “Goo” from 1990, which is based on a paparazzi photo of David and Maureen Smith (Mr. and Mrs. Smith) driving to the Ian Brady and Myra Hindley trial in 1966

(via gabbigolightly)


adventuretime:

Adventure Time: The Art of Ooo

We’ve so been looking forward to this. Today marks the release of Adventure Time: The Art of Ooo, a 352-page oral history/art book tracing the eight-year history of Pen Ward’s cartoon. There’s so, so much information in here, along with an awful lot of unseen art (like these Steve Wolfhard designs for “Be More”).

Congratulations to author Chris McDonnell and Abrams editor Eric Klopfer on a wonderfully excellent job.

(via minimummice)